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Batteries/Lithium-ion Research 080809
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 (March 2007) CIDETEC-IK4 and University of Texas sign agreement to collaborate on research and development of new composite materials for Lithium-ion batteries. The work shared by the two bodies will involve the development of composite materials based on lithium and iron phosphate and a polymer conductor such as polypyrrole.  
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 (March 2007) Researchers from Oxford University’s Department of Physics  study sodium cobaltate to create longer lasting batteries.  Sodium cobaltate, a material similar in structure to the lithium cobaltate used in rechargeable  batteries, is being observed  to unlock the secrets of how ions move around inside the electrodes of lithium-based batteries.   Professor Andrew Boothroyd, a member of the Oxford team notes, “Knowing the forces which drive the sodium ion ordering we can start to understand how the ions move through the structure and explain many of the observed electrical and magnetic properties of this fascinating material -- such as a superconducting phase that only develops after you immerse it in water.”
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 (March 2007) Degussa AG of Germany develops lightweight Lithium-ion batteries.  The novel materials  developed make possible a new generation of starter batteries weighing only 2.5 kg.  The key  element in Degussa’s technology is ‘SEPARION, its new ultra-thin ceramic composite material separator.   Sven Augustin, responsible for the Company’s marketing,   expects the technology to be adopted in hybrid vehicle powertrains.
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 (March 2007) St. Andrews’ researchers in the U.K. develop technique to improve lifetime of lithium rechargeable batteries and reduce overheating problems. The research team has developed   new electrode materials that deliver higher power and higher energy storage.    In the process, nickel, cobalt and manganese ions are embedded at regular intervals in the solid, creating a highly porous structure which allow the electrolyte to make intimate contact with the electrode surface resulting in high rates of discharge. Initial testing suggests the approach could be used to make rechargeable batteries for very high power applications  - vehicles and power tools.  

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