Batteries/New Concepts in Research 031031





Batteries/New Concepts in Research
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 (Oct. 2003) Water batteries, a non-polluting form of electricity, could some day power microelectronic devices. Researchers Daniel Kwok and Larry Kostiuk in the mechanical engineering department  at the University of Edmonton in Canada lighted a tiny bulb by squeezing a syringe of ordinary tap water through a glass ‘filter’ having microscopic-size holes. Power was produced by pushing water through  450,000 holes in a small, common glass disc.  Metal electrodes were attached at either end of the device; a wire was connected to  the electrodes which served as a pathway for the current. Although a 30 cm column of water will only produce one to two microAmps, millions of parallel channels could be used to increase the output of power.  For a complete technical description of this fundamental research, see the October 20th edition of the Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering  published by the London-based Institute of Physics.
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