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Batteries/Lithium-ion polymer 050805
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 Advanced Battery Technologies (ABAT) , Inc. completes phase one testing using Altair’s nanomaterials in its Polymer Lithium-ion (PLI) batteries.  The test results for phase one indicated significant improvements in recharge time when using Altair Nanotechnologies rapid charge Lithium Titanate Spinel Electrode Nanomaterials  in ABT’s PLI batteries. Recharge time was approximately 30 to 45 minutes, compared to recharge time for existing PLI batteries of approximately three to three and a half hours.  The testing was done in Advanced Battery’s Harbin, China Research and Development Center.

ABT Chairman Mr. Zhiguo Fu said, “Through the cooperation of Advanced Battery  and Altair, we’re hoping to change the baisc economics of energy usage in electric vehicles and produce a fundamental change in consumer attitudes toward the electric vehicle.”
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The State of Lithium-ion Thinking - Part 8
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The State of Lithium-ion Thinking - Part 7 Polymer and Power Management
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The State of Lithium-ion Thinking - Part 6 Microbatteries, Military, Nanomaterials and Overcharge Protection
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The State of Lithium-ion Thinking - Part 5 Hybrid Configuration, Life, and Low Temperature
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The State of Lithium-ion Thinking - Part 4
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The State of Lithium-ion Thinking - Part 3 Cathodes, Anodes, Electrolytes and Separators
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The State of Lithium-ion Thinking - Part 2
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The State of Lithium-ion Thinking-Part1
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 Nanostructured MnO2-Based Cathodes for Li-Ion/Polymer Cells
The work is intended to extend the current energy density from 150-175 Wh/kg to 250 Wh/kg. Cathode structures have average size crystallites of 50 nm. and deliver energy density of 440 Wh/kg. Limited cycling testing showed good capacity with no fade. Present work is being conducted with small laboratory cells which require  further research into the crystalites and the addition of dopants.
NASA Tech Briefs, April 2005, p. 48
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The State of Lithium-ion Thinking
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 Solicore introduces self connecting, conductive tape for batteries.  Two new design features for the FlexionTM line of batteries are: anisotropic conductive tape on all batteries which  eliminates the need for soldering or welding the batteries’ terminals to the product. A tab protecting backsplash has also been added to protect each battery’s terminals through the entire supply chain from battery manufacturing, to shipping, and to integration into the customer’s product.   
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(Oct. 2003) Electrovaya receives major contract from NASA.
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(Sept. 2003) IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers)  completes new draft of standard for mobile computer batteries.  The standard IEEE 1625, “Standard for Rechargeable Batteries for Mobile Computers,” utilizes a system approach to improve the reliability of the next generation of rechargeable Lithium-ion and Lithium-ion polymer batteries.  A revised draft will be studied and reviewed by  a broader scope in the industry in October.  

Jeff Layton, IEEE 1625 Working Group Chair, said, “This will be the first standard that seeks to improve user experience by addressing the entire system from individual cells to the overall device. This approach makes a lot of sense because the interactions between the battery cell, battery pack and the computer require a close look at the operating envelope for all elements alone and in concert.”

“IEEE 1625 will be a voluntary standard that specifies minimum guidelines for the design, validation, manufacture and testing of battery cells and packs and the computer.  It will address such areas as qualification, manufacturing, process control, Lithium-ion battery chemistries, packaging and end-user notification.  

The following 18 companies, the IEEE Working Group, have used their collective experience to make such a standard possible: Battery-Biz, Compal, Dell, Dynapack, Fedco Electronics, Hewlett Packard, IBM, Inventec, Motorola, National Semiconductor, Panasonic, Quanta, Samsung, Sanyo, Sony, Solectron, Texas Instruments and Wistron.

More information on the IEEE P1625 Standard can be found in the article entitled “A Revisit to Lithium-ion Safety.”
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(October, 02) Solar and Lithium
(February 2002) Lithium-ion polymer Poised for Market Recovery

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